Opportunity to decrease Australian consumer goods prices by decreasing transport costs

Things are getting interesting now that 3D printing is firmly on the radar.
Australia is a long way by sea or air for imported goods that arrive via transportation methods that cost time and fuel.
The cost to internally distribute goods throughout Australia is also high given our relatively small population and vast distances.
Import/Export and internal distribution costs are a significant cost component of our everyday items.
In a world where clothing, spare parts and potentially cars prices are potentially able to be manufactured by a suitable variation of a 3D printer, importers, wholesale and retail will all be touched in someway by 3D printing and its impact on distribution costs.
I found the article below interesting and thought you might as well.

http://www.strategyand.pwc.com/perspectives/2015-commercial-transportation-trends

BMW says ‘no thanks’ to tech companies and advertisers asking for connected car data

“BMW refuses to yield to tech and advertising firms that are eyeing up the carmaker’s connected car data, it revealed during the Detroit Motor Show.

Speaking at the North American International Auto Show, BMW’S sales and marketing lead, Ian Robertson told The Financial Times that the carmaker is taking the issue of wireless connectivity in cars and data privacy extremely seriously.

“There’s plenty of people out there saying: ‘Give us all the data you’ve got and we can tell you what we can do with it'”.”

http://www.cmo.com.au/article/563988/bmw-says-no-thanks-tech-companies-advertisers-asking-connected-car-data/

Waigaya (not-wagyu) meetings and workplace culture

An extract from an article on Hondas’ Waigaya meetings that challenges hierarchy and old school, top-down, “command and control” culture. It can be frustrating when decisions are pre-programmed due to a process that has been tested and “Waigayaered” already but insanely rewarding when working towards finding a better way.

The trick is to build a culture that has a DNA of open learning.

http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00269?pg=all

USA AdWords Cost Per Click Rises 26% Between 2012 and 2014

Extract from…http://www.adgooroo.com/resources/blog/adwords-cost-per-click-rises-26-between-2012-and-2014/

“Have you been paying more per search click than you used to? So have a lot of advertisers. According to proprietary AdGooroo data, the Cost-Per-Click (CPC) on U.S. AdWords text ads has increased an average of 26% across 9 major industry categories between the first quarters of 2012 and 2014. The data measures desktop and tablet for 2014 and desktop only for 2013 and 2012. 

Rise in Average CPC US AdWords 2012-2014 - AdGooroo

Increases in CPC were most dramatic in the Legal and Automotive categories, where advertisers paid an average of 50% and 45% more per AdWords click, respectively, than they did two years ago.

– See more at: http://www.adgooroo.com/resources/blog/adwords-cost-per-click-rises-26-between-2012-and-2014/#sthash.mJRPhcIm.dpuf

Why every brand needs a heartbeat.

Simon Uwins comments on brands are interesting. Read his full article to get the context.
Given the current projects that I am working on, the following quotes are of interest to me.

Heartbeat

the culture of the company needs to exude a warmth, an emotional electricity whenever and wherever a customer touches it. In other words, it needs a beating heart.

Brand

in today’s connected world, a brand is largely defined by customer experience (and the sharing of it) rather than by any image created through advertising, however heart-warming it may be. Customers can now sense what the culture behind the brand is really like.

Foundations

Building such a culture is more than just developing internal marketing campaigns. Employees after all are people, and people cannot be programmed or scripted to exude warmth. Rather, in my experience, three essential ingredients have to be in place: Purpose, Desire, and Belief.

Click through to Simons blog post on Why every brand needs a heartbeat.